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Archive for July 23rd, 2008

What everybody expects to see in a forensic psychological evaluation is an appraisal of the damages to the children (if any) by competent people. In my case, that meant that the forensic psychologist, Berrill, should have interviewed the surgeon who placed Camille’s second implant, perhaps Camille’s speech therapists. Interviews? None.

Now for the “scientific content” of the forensic evaluation: the “diagnostic impression” from the MCMI-III test, which takes almost a visit to complete, tells that “Axis II” (there are three of these axes) is messed up. I have “prominent narcissistic personality features”, and sicko ex-wife “histrionic, narcissistic and obsessive- compulsive personality features.” What is the link between these lovely features and my relationship with my daughters? Go figure; see Dr. Phil or the psychic at the corner of the street.

Then, the clever interview trick, that you learn about later on. Berrill told the girls that if they were to feel uncomfortable during their interview with me, they just had to make a sign -touch their nose- and Berrill would stop their ordeal. My little one, Chloé, six year old then, had to test if Superman Berrill would indeed rescue them from their evil father. She touched her nose twenty minutes after the interview started. Investigating this discomfort with another visit? Duh.

Finally, the bouquet of the report: the customized recommendations. The relationship between father and children is damaged and more supervised visitations will do the trick to repair it. The opposite is exactly true: more supervised visitations with me, and unsupervised mother brainwashing of the girls will end up killing my relationship with them. Father should receive medical reports and children’s report card, and email communication between father and the girls should be encouraged. If there is a Berrill’s patient who got different recommendations from him, raise your hand!

Thank you, Dr Berrill!

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Let's Get Honest! Absolutely Uncommon Analysis of Family & Conciliation Courts' Operations, Practices, & History

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